Helena Clayton | Team
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Teamwork is the engine of an organisation.

 

The trouble is, sometimes those engines are a bit rusty, don’t always start first time and can leak oil. On the flipside, if you can help a team find their collective mojo, it acts like an MOT and service for the entire business.

When teams work well, members are crystal clear about their roles and responsibilities. They hold each other accountable but also celebrate good work. They balance good listening with honest opinions, and when conflict arises – as it inevitably does – they’re skilled and confident enough to have the tough but fair conversations that are required.

I work with teams to develop these skills, and help get them into the habit of having the sorts of profitable conversations that move an organisation forward. Turning a disparate group of people into a resilient team with a shared sense of purpose is one of the most satisfying areas of my work.

 

‘I don’t really know how you did it, but it was the first time I have seen that group come together in the way it did. The group had conversations that had never been had before…’

Robin Mortimer, CEO, Port of London Authority

 

Examples of recent team development projects include:

Working with a CEO and his Executive team to develop a high performing culture and strengthen their relationships as they faced the challenges of implementing a new strategy with a new CEO. Using MBTI and 360 feedback, I helped each individual understand their unique contribution and impact on the team, then guided them in developing a Team Manifesto which clarified their purpose and values. In the process, they had real conversations about what was working and what wasn’t, and evolved into a much more flexible and trusting team.
Supporting a leadership team to explore how they might work together better – in the face of considerable internal tension – as they put together a strategy for an important transformation project. Using frameworks including Lencioni’s Five Dysfunctions of a Team and De Bono’s Six Thinking Hats, alongside a set of structured activities to enable safe disclosure of how they were feeling, the team had conversations of an unprecedented openness and positivity. They report that their team dynamic has undergone a lasting change.
Do get in touch if you’d like to discuss any of these case studies and results in more detail, or explore ways in which team development might work for you.